How to Prevent Osteoporosis a Complete Guide

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How to Prevent Osteoporosis

Overview: How to Prevent Osteoporosis!

Studies show that approximately one in two women and one in four men 50 and older will have a bone fracture due to osteoporosis. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and brittle – so brittle that fracture can occur due to falling or mild stress such as bending or coughing. Osteoporosis-related fractures most commonly occur in the hip, wrist, or spine. Bone is living tissue that is constantly breaking down and being replaced. Osteoporosis occurs when new bone formation does not keep up with an old bone loss. The balance between old bone breakdown and new bone formation changes at different stages of our lives.

  • In childhood and adolescence, new bone is formed very quickly. This allows our bones to be bigger and stronger (thicker). Bone density reaches its peak from our mid to mid-20s.
  • Subsequently, new bone is produced at the same rate as the old bone is broken. This means that the adult skeleton is completely renewed over a period of 7 to 10 years.
  • Eventually, by the age of about 40, the bone begins to break more rapidly than its location, so our bones slowly begin to lose their density.

We all have some degree of bone loss as we get older, but the term osteoporosis is only used when bones become quite fragile. When the bone is affected by osteoporosis, the holes in the structure of the hive become larger and the overall density is lower, which is why bone fractures are more likely to occur.

Risk factors

Several factors can increase the likelihood that you will develop osteoporosis – including your age, race, lifestyle choices, and medical conditions and treatment and in these cases we come to know how to prevent osteoporosis.

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Some risk factors for osteoporosis are beyond your control, including:

  • Your sex is more likely to develop osteoporosis in women than men.
  • Age: The older you are, the greater the risk of osteoporosis.
  • Race: If you are of white or Asian origin, you are at the greatest risk of osteoporosis.
  • Family history: Having a parent or siblings with osteoporosis puts you at greater risk, especially if your mother or father has fractured the hip.
  • Body shape: Men and women who have small body frames have a higher risk because they may have reduced bone size at an early age.

Hormone levels

Osteoporosis is more common in people who have too many or too few hormones in their bodies. They include:

  • Sex hormones: Low sex hormone levels weaken bone. A decrease in estrogen levels in women in menopause is one of the strongest risk factors for developing osteoporosis.

Testosterone levels in men gradually decrease with aging. Treatments for prostate cancer that reduce testosterone levels in men and treatments for breast cancer that reduce estrogen levels in women are likely to accelerate bone loss.

  • Thyroid problems: Too much thyroid hormone can cause bone loss. This can happen when your thyroid is hyperactive or if you take thyroid hormone medication to treat the thyroid.
  • Other glands: Osteoporosis has also been associated with overactive parathyroid and adrenal glands.

Some other factors are

People who are more likely to have osteoporosis:

  • Low calcium intake: A lifelong deficiency of calcium plays a role in the development of osteoporosis. Low calcium intake increases bone density, early bone loss and fracture risk.
  • Eating disorders: Severely restricting food intake and underweight in both underweight men and women.
  • Gastrointestinal surgery: Surgery to reduce the size of your stomach or remove part of the intestine limits the amount of surface area available to absorb nutrients, including calcium. These surgeries include those that help you to lose weight and other gastrointestinal disorders.

How to Prevention Osteoporosis?

Since it is necessary to build strong and healthy bones starting at an early age, everyone should maintain a balanced diet and exercise regularly throughout life to avoid osteoporosis later in life.

  1. Balanced diet

For example, eat calcium-rich foods

  • Dairy products such as milk, yogurt, and cheese (low-fat milk and skimmed milk have less saturated fat and are health options)
  • Seafood is eaten with bones or shells, such as whitebait, dried silverfish and dried shrimp.
  • Soybean products like tofu, fortified soy milk, soya chicken, bean stick and biannulate sheet
  • Dark green leafy vegetables, e.g. White Cabbage, Broccoli and Chinese Flower Cabbage
  • nuts, e.g. Almonds and Sesame
  • Ensure adequate vitamin D intakes, such as egg yolk and fortified milk
  • Avoid salty foods, such as salted fish and soy sauce that affect calcium absorption
  1. Do not smoke and do not drink too much. Reduce beverages that contain caffeine such as coffee and tea.
  2. Perform weight gain exercises, e.g. brisk walking, tai chi, or gymnastics exercises, at least 3 times a week and for 30-60 minutes each time.
  1. Perform outdoor activities to absorb sunlight which will help the body produce more vitamin D to increase the absorption of calcium. Beware of sunburn. Bone metabolism is a continuous process and bone loss begins at the age of 35 years. Therefore, everyone should take steps to prevent osteoporosis.

Conclusion

Osteoporosis occurs when new bone formation does not keep up with an old bone loss. The balance between old bone breakdown and new bone formation changes at different stages of our lives. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and brittle – so brittle that fracture can occur due to falling or mild stress such as bending or coughing. Osteoporosis-related fractures most commonly occur in the hip, wrist, or spine. Since it is necessary to build strong and healthy bones starting at an early age, everyone should maintain a balanced diet and exercise regularly throughout life to Prevent Osteoporosis later in life.